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12/27/2013
IOWA CORN GROWERS ASSN.

Iowa Corn Information Packet 2014

The Iowa Corn Growers Association (ICGA) and the Iowa Corn Promotion Board (ICPB) have compiled a selection of stories and information about Iowa’s corn industry that we hope will be useful to you and your readers this year.

Please let us know if we can be of further assistance in answering questions or arranging interviews with key Iowa Corn Growers Association and Iowa Corn Promotion Board leaders.

Thank you for working with us to educate Iowans about the importance of the corn industry in Iowa.

A complete list of these stories can also be found on our website at: http://www.iowacorn.org/en/news/corn_information_packets/

December 26, 2013 – JOHNSTON – The Iowa Corn Growers Association (ICGA) is fighting for members on important legislative issues such as the Farm Bill, ethanol, transportation infrastructure, conservation practices and much more. Your ICGA membership is critical to the success of the corn industry – both in Iowa and in Washington D.C.

As a grower, you need to take control and help combat the key issues facing your business. Becoming a member of Iowa Corn will help connect you with over 7,600 Iowa growers who share a collective voice for policy issues that impact corn. Membership keeps growers informed on key issues and allows their voice to be heard. Joining the other members of Iowa corn allows you to come together to create opportunities for long-term corn grower profitability.

“Your ICGA membership ensures a consistent and accurate message is delivered to leaders and legislators,” says Roger Zylstra, a farmer from Jasper and ICGA president. “Uniting growers, associates and student members allows Iowa Corn to continue creating partnerships for future generations.”

Now is the time to get involved and help our association grow. As a member, stand strong and grow with us by becoming a member of the ICGA.

Member Benefits Include:

* Vehicle specials through Ford Partner X-Plan Pricing
* Newsletters and up-to-date information on the corn industry
* Several VIP member events including the Iowa Corn Cy-Hawk Series games and the Iowa Corn Indy 300*
* State and National scholarship programs
* UPS savings program
* Discounted NASCAR® tickets
* Events subject to change

Join ICGA and learn more about the work we are doing to advocate for our farmer members. Visit our website at
iowacorn.org/membership to see a complete list of benefits.

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CONTACT:
Mindy Williamson
Director of Communications
515-225-9242
Conserving Land and Water Quality

December 26, 2013 – JOHNSTON – The Iowa Nutrient Reduction Strategy is a voluntary, science-based framework designed to aggressively reduce nitrogen and phosphorus to Iowa waters and the Gulf of Mexico by 45 percent. This strategy addresses point sources such as waste water treatment plants and nonpoint sources such as farm fields. Iowa Corn supports the Nutrient Reduction Strategy.

“Improving conservation practices today is important to preserve the land and water quality for future generations,” says Roger Zylstra, a farmer from Jasper County and ICGA president.

These conservation practices include: cover crops, buffer strips, bioreactors, wetlands, drainage water management, proper nutrient application and reduced tillage.

Cover crops are gaining popularity because they reduce erosion and also retain nutrients that may be lost to runoff or leaching. Farmers who attend the Power Farming Show, January 28-30 can get practical, proven cover crop management tips from fellow Corn Belt crop and livestock farmers. The three-day Cover Crop workshop will offer topic including: selecting cover crops, popular seeding methods, how and when to terminate cover crops and making cover crops work in your livestock operation.

The Nutrient Reduction Strategy emphasizes that the private sector must help in order for the strategy’s goals to be met. In response to this, the Iowa Conservation Action Network (IACAN) was recently launched as a unique private sector initiative to demonstrate technology-based conservation practice planning. IACAN is a partnership formed by the Iowa Corn Growers Association (ICGA), Iowa Soybean Association (ISA), and Iowa Land Improvement Contractors Association (LICA). The network is a private sector initiative to demonstrate technology-based conservation practice planning to accelerate implementation of Iowa’s Nutrient Reduction Strategy.

A key element of IACAN is offering free conservation planning assistance to ICGA and ISA farmer members for a limited time in five priority watersheds: Floyd, Turkey, Middle Cedar, and East and West Nishnabotna. Members in these watersheds can call, email, or attend meetings to get planning assistance for grassed waterways, wetlands, ponds, sediment basins, and soil loss assessments. For more information about IACAN, visit www.iowaconservation.org.

For more information about the nutrient reduction strategy, visit www.nutrientstrategy.iastate.edu or
www.cleanwateriowa.org.

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CONTACT:
Mindy Williamson
Director of Communications
515-225-9242

Ethanol

December 26, 2013 – JOHNSTON – Ethanol production from corn is a 30-plus-year development in Iowa. It is under scrutiny by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as they propose to lower the Renewable Volume Obligation (RVO) from 14.4 billion gallons to 13.01 billion gallons. In addition to impacting farmers productivity and conventional ethanol production today, the proposed RVO could halt second generation ethanol production.

Groups like POET and DuPont Pioneer have invested in the cellulosic ethanol industry, but it is at “pivotal stage in its development as a viable alternative fuel,” according to the DuPont Pioneer website.

The current challenges include; feedstock collection, conversion, and infrastructure. Since 2008, Pioneer has had a demonstration-scale operating facility in Vonore, Tennessee. It has been generating the data necessary to finalize the integrated scale-up technology for commercial production in Iowa.

Most corn producers in Iowa, even with weather challenges have had increased yields over the last 10-15 years. Better genetics, reduced tillage and increased usage of stacked traits and foliar fungicides have increased yields and organic matter at the same time.

According to DuPont Pioneer, “They’ve also resulted in a higher level of corn residue remaining in fields the following spring. Excess residue in corn fields harbors disease, interferes with planting, impedes stand establishment, and ties up nitrogen, making it necessary to implement residue management strategies. With better residue management practices, you can potentially grow more corn more profitably, while reaping agronomic advantages that improve future yield potential and reducing residue management costs and hassles.”

What does 2nd generation ethanol employ in Iowa?

1. 60-70 full-time high paying permanent jobs
2. 150 people in collection, transportation, and storage
3. 1,000 construction related jobs
4. 500 local farmers

The DuPont facility in Nevada is one of five commercial plants currently underway in the United States fueled by corn stover biomass harvested from a 30-mile radius around the facility. Set to be running in late 2014, it will be one of the first and largest advanced biorefineries in the world.

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Expanding Corn Markets

Market Development: 38%

Many individuals and groups working together made ethanol a success, and the Iowa Corn Checkoff remains an essential contributor to that team effort. From its very first project to today, the checkoff has paid for ethanol promotions, ethanol education, and ethanol advertising to create today’s market. In the past decade, ICPB efforts advanced from simple ethanol promotion to support the development of Iowa’s farmer-owned ethanol industry and expand the fueling opportunities and resulting use of ethanol. More recently, ethanol demand within Iowa has strengthened basis for growers, increased corn prices, and grower ownership of new plants means farmers are sharing in the value-added profits from ethanol.

ICPB market development projects over the years have also helped build demand for new corn uses in sweeteners and plastics. In the livestock sector, the ICPB has contributed more than $7 million to develop pork and beef export markets through U.S. Meat Export Federation programs. As Iowa ethanol production grew, the checkoff has also committed funds to dried distillers grains (DDG) marketing and education – an initiative that benefits both to livestock producers and Iowa’s ethanol industry.

Export sales in recent years have been record setting and the result of a near-total rebuilding of export markets.
The top U.S. markets of 1978 are gone: At that time, 60% of corn shipments went to the European Union, Soviet Union, and Poland. As those markets disappeared, ICPB funding, much of it for U.S. Grains Council programs, built demand in other regions, tripling U.S. corn sales to Japan, Mexico, Taiwan, South Korea, and Egypt and creating additional new markets in countries like Colombia, Morocco, and Indonesia.

Research: 25%

Before the checkoff, groups like the Iowa Corn Growers Association lacked the funds to support even modest research projects. Since then, ICPB research programs have grown in scope. ICPB seed money has played a critical role in mapping the corn genome. Research with checkoff investments will result in higher blends of renewable fuels, better livestock feed, new bioplastics and a better understanding of the impact of corn production on land area, commonly referred to as international indirect land use. The information gleaned from research will help support existing markets and develop new markets for corn.

The key objectives for this research are to: develop new markets for corn, develop new starch based bioplastics,
nitrogen use efficiency traits, overcome the current limits to ethanol use in gasoline (blend wall) to increase use
of biofuels, address supplements used in distillers grain as a livestock feed.

Education: 24%
The wave of corn and ethanol “hate” stories has been overwhelming, but the checkoff continues to defend the corn industry and all uses of corn. “Proactively supporting the value of corn in food and fuel” has been and continues to be a top priority. Through events like the Iowa Corn Cy-Hawk Series, the Iowa Corn checkoff is able to reach consumers in Iowa. Research shows that 65 percent of all Iowans tune into the Iowa and Iowa State football game each September. With radio, television, digital, social media, and more messages consistent through different sporting events, the Iowa Corn Cy-Hawk Series is a great way to reach consumers about issues important to corn growers.

The Iowa Corn Indy 250 has been a great way to educate consumers about using ethanol. Since the series started they have used ethanol at 100 or 85 percent, which equals to more than 20,000 less gallons per year.

Bringing the farm to non-farm audiences is difficult, but the Iowa Corn checkoff funds a blogger tour that has reached millions each year with the farm experience through the eyes of bloggers and their followers. Last year, one blogger said, “I get it, I only have to worry about feeding my family, but farmers have to worry about feeding everyone.” Messages like that are echoed by the more than 30 bloggers who have attended the past four tours.

You can find Iowa Corn education through fact sheets, newsletters, social media, and online at www.iowacorn.org.

The Iowa corn checkoff began in 1977 at 1/10¢ per bushel as the first corn checkoff in the nation established through a grower referendum. Today, the Iowa corn checkoff collects 1 cent for each bushel of corn sold into commercial channels to be used for research, market development, and education and it is refundable.


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CONTACT:
Mindy Williamson
Director of Communications
515-225-9242


Cover Crops

December 26, 2013 – JOHNSTON – Save the Date! Get Cover Crop Tips from Experienced Farmers At Iowa Power Farming Show January 28-30.

When you attend the Iowa Power Farming Show, January 28-30, plan to get practical, proven cover crop management tips from Corn Belt crop and livestock farmers. Many experienced Iowa farmers, including Tim Smith, Steve Berger and Chris Gaesser, will be featured speakers during the three-day Cover Crops Workshops in Des Moines.

Free with admission to the show, the one-hour concurrent sessions will run from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Thursday. The noon session “Optimizing Production Risk with Cover Crops Makes Managing Market Risk Easier” will feature grain marketing analyst Elaine Kub.

Core topics offered in both morning and afternoon sessions include:

* Selecting cover crops
* Five popular seeding methods
* How and when to terminate cover crops
* Making cover crops work in your livestock operation

Certified Crop Advisors may receive up to 46 continuing education unit credits for attending the Cover Crop Workshop sessions: Nutrient Management, 6; Soil & Water Management, 32; and Crop Management, 8.
For more details and to view a session schedule go to www.cdiowa.org.
Cover Crop Workshop financial supporters and contributors include DuPont Pioneer, Saddle Butte Ag, Kimberley Ag
Consulting, KB Seed Solutions and GS3 Quality Seed, Iowa Farm Bureau Federation, Iowa Corn Growers Association,
Iowa Pork Producers Association and the Oregon Ryegrass Growers Seed Commission.

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I-LEAD Class VI

December 26, 2013 – JOHNSTON – Iowa’s agriculture leadership today is built on generations of individuals who have taken time to be leaders. The Iowa Corn Promotion Board (ICPB) and Iowa Corn Growers Association (ICGA) sponsor a leadership training program called I-LEAD, for talented people who want to contribute to a better future for Iowa’s communities.

“The I-LEAD program is a two-year program that has resulted in 100 ag leaders graduating since it started,” said Bob Hemesath, a farmer and chair of the committee that oversees the program. “It was developed by farmers who saw a need to train the next generation of Iowa Corn leaders, but also to create those that could lead local boards, schools, and other opportunities.”

An I-LEAD graduate will gain skills to increase grassroots leadership, define their personal leadership style, work together with different personalities and background, and they will be able to communicate/advocate for agriculture.

Key components of the class includes an Iowa experience, a domestic mission, and an intensive international mission, solely supported by class member fundraising. The most recent class traveled to China in December, but previous classes have traveled to Colombia, Panama, Korea, Japan, Spain, and Egypt.

“Each class dives into learning more about our agriculture in Iowa, but they also know we live in a global marketplace. They look at the globe and look into what are the emerging issues and markets,” said Hemesath. “They come from different backgrounds in production agriculture and agri-business, but they see the greater good in creating quality leadership skills for our industry.”

The current class is completing their first year of a two-year program. They will graduate from the program during a special ceremony at the Iowa Corn annual meeting in August 2014. 16 former I-LEAD graduates are currently in leadership roles for the corn industry.

For more information on Class 7, please visit www.iowacorn/ilead. Those interested in the next class can submit their information for consideration in late July.

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2014 Federal and State Legislative Priorities

December 26, 2013 – JOHNSTON – As the 2014 Iowa Legislative session begins, the Iowa Corn Growers Association (ICGA) will be working with lawmakers to promote policies and programs important to Iowa corn growers and to monitor any policy that could negatively affect farmers.

In late August, grassroots representatives of ICGA reinstated expiring policies and adopted new resolutions at the ICGA annual meeting and policy conference in Des Moines.

“Input from ICGA members is the cornerstone of our legislative process,” says Roger Zylstra, a farmer from Lynnville and the current Iowa Corn Growers Association president. “It is important that corn growers from across the state are engaged in policy decisions that affect their operations. Our organization is working tirelessly at the state and national levels on behalf of our farmer members to enact and protect policies that affect our profitability.”

The Iowa Corn Growers Association has established the top legislative priorities at the state and federal levels for 2014.

The 2014 state-level priorities, in alphabetical order, include:

Biodiesel:
* Support extension of current production tax credit for biodiesel plants (expiring)

Checkoff:
* Raise the legislative cap to the corn checkoff so that farmers can choose by referendum whether they want a corn checkoff increase.

Conservation:
* Implementation of Iowa Nutrient Reduction Strategy: funding, revisions, monitoring, etc.

Iowa Department of Agriculture:
* Funding for Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship budget requests (state veterinarian, conservation, fuels, etc.)

Ethanol:
* Support a legislative resolution of the Iowa House and Senate in support of the federal RFS, to be submitted to Environmental Protection Agency, as well as support for an extension or increase of current income tax credits and fuel tax differential for ethanol

Livestock:
* Support for the livestock industry and the existing laws regulating livestock operations
* Support for increased funding for the Iowa State University Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory (to full $4 million

Research:
* Increased funding ($2.8 million) for Iowa State University Experiment Station and other agriculture-related research

Tax:
* Property Tax - support maintaining the agriculture productivity formula

Transportation:
* Increased funding, including fuel tax increase for roads and bridges

The 2014 federal-level priorities, in alphabetical order, include:

Biotechnology:
* Support and defend the use of genetically modified crops

Environment:
* Defend against Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) water quality issues: (Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs), nutrient criteria, Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasure (SPCC), Clean Water Act Jurisdiction)

Ethanol:
* Support for retaining Renewable Fuel Standard – Defense against EPA’s 2014 Renewable Volume Obligations and Congressional action
* Support for higher blends for conventional cars (E15+) including regulatory issues (ex: removing the1 pound waiver)

Farm Bill:
* Pass farm bill and retain current structure and funding level for crop insurance
* Protect/maintain Market Access Program (MAP) and Foreign Market Development (FMD)

Research:
* Support agricultural research for corn, corn products, and agriculture

Taxes:
* Extend expiring agricultural tax credits or make permanent: bonus depreciation, Sec. 179, capital gains

Trade:
* Support for Trade Promotion Authority

Transportation:
* Support for appropriation for Mississippi River lock & dams, including the Water Resources Reform and Development Act (WRRDA) & barge fuel tax

In late February, farmer delegates from Iowa and other states will come together at the National Corn Growers Association (NCGA) Commodity Classic to set, edit and establish NCGA policy for the coming years.

The complete 2013-14 Iowa Corn Growers Association state and federal policy resolution book can be found online at www.iowacorn.org/policy.

The Iowa Corn Growers Association is a membership organization, lobbying on agricultural issues on behalf of its over
7,600 farmer members.

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Collegiate Advisory Team | 2014

December 26, 2013 – JOHNSTON – 18 Iowa college students have been named to the fourth Iowa Corn Collegiate Advistory Team (CAT). The Iowa Corn CAT is sponsored by the Iowa Corn Growers Association (ICGA) and the Iowa Corn Promotion Board (ICPB).

The Iowa Corn CAT assists the ICGA and ICPB in developing programs that target and enhance Iowa Corn’s relationship with students who are pursuing careers in agricultural production and agriculture business and industries.

“The new Iowa Corn Collegiate Advisory Team is extremely passionate about agriculture and they will work to sustain the future of agriculture for our state,” says Bob Hemesath, an ICGA farmer director and chair of the committee overseeing the program. “Iowa Corn is excited to work with this new team and foster their agricultural ideas.”

Iowa Corn CAT members:

* Titan Immel of Adair is a first year student at DMACC-Ankeny Campus. Immel is majoring in ag business.
* Trent Kischer of Albert City is a junior at Dordt College. Kischer is majoring in plant science.
* Kristin Scholten of Inwood is a senior at Dordt College. Scholten is majoring in business administration.
* Stephen Chamness of Blairsburg is a first year student at Ellsworth Community College. Chamness is majoring in agriculture.
* Tyler Pettit of Creston is a senior at Graceland University. Pettit is majoring in ag business.
* Shelby Cornelius of Waterloo is a second year student at Hawkeye Community College. Cornelius is majoring in ag business.
* Brogan Bulechek of Centerville is a first year student at Indian Hills Community College. Bulechek is majoring in agriculture.
* Brandon Strutzenberg of Manson is a second year student at Iowa Central Community College. Strutzenberg is majoring in agriculture technology.
* Cassie Galm of Spencer is a second year student at Iowa Lakes Community College. Galm is majoring in agriculture.
* Katherine Sennert of Linn Grove is a senior at Iowa State University. Sennert is majoring in ag communications.
* Ashley Smeby of Klemme is a freshman at Iowa State University. Smeby is majoring in ag business.
* Adam Striegel of What Cheer is a sophmore at Iowa State University. Striegel is majoring in agriculture and life sciences education.
* Samantha Urmie of Long Grove is a first year student at Muscatine Community College. Urmie is majoring in agribusiness.
* Ben Leuder of West Union is a second year student at Northeast Iowa Community College. Leuder is majoring in ag production.
* Haley Vandenberg of Farmington is a first year student at Southeastern Community College. Vandenberg is majoring in ag business.

Also chosen to return to the Iowa Corn CAT from the 2012-13 team:

* Lisa Nelson of Lake Mills is a senior at Iowa State University. Nelson is majoring in ag business with minors in agronomy and animal science.
* Marcie Stevenson of Wheatland is a senior at Iowa State University. Stevenson is majoring in ag business, economics and international agriculture.
* Dawn James of Buffalo Center is a second year student at North Iowa Area Community College. James is majoring in ag marketing and finance.

The students were chosen to the team for a one-year term but can reapply for a second term.

Editors: For photos of Iowa Corn CAT members, call 515-225-9242 or e-mail corninfo@iowacorn.org.

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Iowa Corn Promotion Board | 2013-2014 OFFICERS

JOHNSTON, Iowa – Dec. 26, 2013 – Farmer leaders for the Iowa Corn Promotion Board (ICPB) were elected earlier this year. ICPB directors work on market development, education and research. ICPB’s mission is to create opportunities for long-term Iowa corn grower profitability.

Bob Bowman, ICPB president, farms with his son near DeWitt. Bowman is a past president of the Iowa Corn Growers Association and former county president for the Farm Bureau. He represents Crop Reporting District 6.

Chris Edgington, ICPB vice president farms with his father, brother and son near St. Ansgar. Edgington is a graduate of the Iowa Corn Leadership and Enhancement Development Program (ILEAD). He represents Crop Reporting District 2.

Kevin Rempp, ICPB chair, farms in a family operation in Poweshiek County near Montezuma. Rempp is also an I-LEAD graduate. He represents Crop Reporting District 5.

In addition, the Iowa Corn Promotion Board has representatives in crop districts throughout the state representing corn growers in each of those areas.

* Lowell Appleton of Sanborn works in Sheldon and farms in O’Brien County. He represents Crop District 1 in northwest Iowa.
* Chris Weydert of Algona farms in a family operation in Kossuth County and represents Crop District 2 in northern Iowa.
* Nick Leibold of New Hampton farms in Chickasaw County and represents Crop District 3 in northeastern Iowa.
* Larry Klever of Audubon farms in Audubon County and represents Crop District 4 in southwest Iowa.
* Roscoe Eggers of State Center farms in Marshall County and represents Crop District 5 in central Iowa.
* Mark Heckman of West Liberty farms in Muscatine County and represents Crop District 6 in eastern Iowa.
* Duane Aistrope of Randolph farms in Fremont/Page County and represents Crop District 7 in southeast Iowa.
* Donald Hunerdosse of Milo farms in Warren County and represents Crop District 8 in south-central Iowa.
* Wayne Humphreys of Columbus Junction farms in Louisa County and represents Crop District 9 in eastern Iowa.
* Deb Keller of Clarion has a family-farm operation in Wright County and holds an at-large seat. Keller is a past chair of the ICPB. She currently serves on the U.S. Grains Council.

Julius Schaaf, a past ICPB chair of Randolph is currently chairman of the U.S. Grains Council.

Editors: For a complete list or photos of directors, call 515-225-9242 or e-mail corninfo@iowacorn.org.

The Iowa Corn Promotion Board (ICPB), works to develop and defend markets, fund research, and provide education about corn and corn products.

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Iowa Corn Growers Association | 2013-2014 OFFICERS

JOHNSTON, Iowa – December 26, 2013 – Farmer leaders for the Iowa Corn Growers Association (ICGA) were elected earlier this year. ICGA directors represent more than 7,600 members and bring grassroots policy issues forward. ICGA’s mission is to create opportunities for long-term Iowa corn grower profitability.

Roger Zylstra, ICGA president, farms with his son near Lynnville in Jasper County. Roger has been involved with ICGA for several years and is the past secretary and treasurer for ICGA. He represents Crop Reporting District 5.

Jerry Mohr, ICGA vice president, farms near Eldridge in Scott County. Mohr represents Crop Reporting District 6.

Bruce Rohwer of Paullina is ICGA chair. His family farm operation is in O’Brien/Sioux County. He has served as ICGA president. He represents Crop Reporting District 1.

In addition, ICGA has representatives in crop districts throughout the state representing corn growers in each of those areas.

* Dean Meyer of Rock Rapids farms in Lyon County and represents Crop District 1 in northwest Iowa.
* Gary Woodley of Clarion farms in Wright County and represents Crop District 2 in northern Iowa.
* Bob Hemesath of Decorah farms in a family operation in Winneshiek County. He serves Crop District 3.
* Curt Mether of Logan farms in Harrison County in western Iowa, representing Crop District 4.
* Dennis Friest of Radcliffe operates a family farm in Hardin County. He represents Crop District 5 in central Iowa.
* Jim Greif of Monticello farms in Linn County and represents Crop District 6 in eastern Iowa.
* Carl Jardon of Randolph farms in Fremont County and represents Crop District 7 in southwestern Iowa.
* Kyle Phillips of Knoxville farms in Marion County and represents Crop District 8 in south-central Iowa.
* Kurt Hora of Washington has a family operation in Washington County. He represents Crop District 9 in eastern Iowa.
* Dean Taylor of Prairie City farms in Jasper County and holds an at-large seat for ICGA. Taylor is a past ICGA president.
* Kevin Ross of Minden farms in Pottawattamie County and also holds an at-large seat for ICGA. Ross is a past ICGA president and is also serving on the National Corn Growers Association’s (NCGA) governing Board.
* Pam Johnson of Floyd has a family farm operation in Floyd County. Johnson holds an at-large seat for ICGA and is currently the NCGA president.

Don Elsbernd of Postville is also serving on the NCGA board.

Liasons to the ICGA include:

* Rolland Schnell of Jasper County works at Iowa Soybean Associaiton.
* Charlie Norris of Cerro Gordo County works at Iowa Farm Bureau Federation.

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Editors: For a complete list or photos of directors, call 515-225-9242 or e-mail corninfo@iowacorn.org.

The Iowa Corn Growers Association (ICGA) is a membership organization lobbying on agricultural issues on behalf of its 7,600 farmer members.

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Graph of Iowa Checkoff Dollars Spent in 2013

 

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